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Banner - Inventory of Databases on Childrens Lives

The Inventory of Data Sources on Children’s Lives is an online resource aimed at a range of users including those involved in research, service planning, service evaluation and policy development and monitoring. Its aim is to promote awareness and increased use of existing data sources on children’s lives.

The inventory was initially compiled during the development of the National Strategy for Research and Data on Children’s Lives, 2011-2016 and encompassed:

  • Data sources that related to children and their families, or services and supports for children and families;
  • Data sources that were expected to be updated on an ongoing or regular basis.
  • Data sources currently being developed and once-off data sources were excluded.

Further details on the background to the inventory and information on its structure are available in the document Overview of Inventory of Data Source on Children's Lives

The inventory is presented in 3 categories:

  1. Administrative Data Sources i.e. data collected for or through the administration of specific schemes or services
  2. Cross-sectional Surveys and Censuses
  3. Longitudinal Surveys

Searchable database fields

Index to the Inventory of Data Sources on Children's Lives

Download summaries by type

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or Browse the database

Administrative Data Sources

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A1 Annual Return for Private Schools (Infant, Junior and Preparatory)

Summary data of a small number of private (non-aided) traditional primary and Montessori private schools, catering for children spanning the age range of 3 years to 8+ years.

Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie)

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A2 Annual Return for Schools (Early Start Pre-School Programme)

Summary data of a small number of schools participating in the Early Start Pre-School Programme.

Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie)

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A3 & A4 Annual Return for Schools (Primary and Primary-Integrated)

Summary data of primary schools aided by the Department of Education and Skills.

Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie)

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A5 & A7 Annual Return for Schools (Primary): Special Class

Summary data of primary schools aided by the Department of Education and Skills in which children are taught by a recognised special class teacher or resource teacher.

Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie)

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A6 Annual Return for Schools (Special Schools)

Summary data of primary special schools aided by the Department of Education and Skills.

Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie)

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A8 Application for Social Housing Support

Application form completed by applicant for social housing support. Data collected include information on income, employment status, household structure, current accommodation and housing requirements.

Local housing authorities and the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government (www.environ.ie)

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A9 Application form for Additional Child One-Parent Family Payment (OFP38)

The One-Parent Family Scheme provides income support for lone parents.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A10 Application form for Adoptive Benefit (AB1)

The Adoptive Benefit Scheme is the short-term benefit for adoptive parents.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A11 Application form for Child Benefit (CB1)

The Child Benefit Scheme is an income support for families with children.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A12 Application form for Child Benefit (CB2)

The Child Benefit Scheme is an income support for families with children.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A13 Application form for Maternity Benefit (MB10)

The Maternity Benefit Scheme is an income support for women on

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A14 Application form for One-Parent Family Payment (OFP1)

The One-Parent Family Scheme is an income support for lone parents.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A15 Child Benefit: Report of events that may affect your claim (CB56)

Data collected include changes of address, leaving the country, death of parent/child or other circumstances that affect Child Benefit payments.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A16i Guardian’s Payment (Contributory or Non-Contributory) (GP1)

Guardian’s payments are made in respect of orphans.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A16ii Application form for Family Income Supplement (FIS)

The Family Income Supplement (FIS) provides income support to families on a low wage with children

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A17 Summary of Social Housing Assessments

The Summary of Social Housing Assessments provides a national overview of housing need, based on the data collected at an individual level by the Application for Social Housing Support (see A8).

Local housing authorities and the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government (www.environ.ie)

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A18i Childcare Activity and Performance Measures

The Child and Family Agency (Tusla) is responsible for the collection and collation of statistical information on services for child welfare and protection, alternative care (fostering, residential), adoption, homelessness and family support services. The data collected include information on outcomes of child abuse reports, numbers availing of family support services, numbers and categories of children in care, numbers availing of youth homelessness services, and services for separated children seeking asylum.

Child and Family Agency (www.tusla.ie)

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A18ii Quarter 4 Addendum

The Child and Family Agency (Tusla) is responsible for the collection and collation of specific statistical information on services for child welfare and protection on an annual return basis. This data is now ollected in a return known as the Quarter 4 Addendum (replacement for the previous Child Care Interim Dataset). The data collected include information on admissions to care during theyear by age and gender and placement type; the primary reasons for admission to care; legal reasons for admissions into care (Care Orders; Voluntary Care); Number of children by age and gender subject to a new Supervision Order; Number of children by age and gender who are subject to a Supervision Order; Third Care Placement within 12 months: Total length of time in care; Annual aftercare metrics; Youth Homeless annual return metrics; Number of discharges from care by age and gender and care placement type (from 2013); Number of children in care by age and gender and care type; Legal reason for being in care on 31st December by age, gender and care type.

Child and Family Agency (www.tusla.ie)

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A19 Cystic Fibrosis Registration and Diagnosis Form

The Cystic Fibrosis Registry of Ireland project was established in 2001 to keep the relevant medical records of each patient with cystic fibrosis in a central database. Enrolment on the Register is voluntary and currently over 90% of the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) population are registered.

Cystic Fibrosis Registry of Ireland (www.cfri.ie)

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A20 Domestic Adoptions Form

Form completed by applicant for domestic adoption. Information collected includes biographical details, social work assessment reports, medical data and income data.

The Adoption Authority of Ireland (www.aai.gov.ie)

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A21 Inter-country Adoptions Form

Form is completed by applicant for Inter-country adoption. Information collected includes biographical details, social work assessment reports, medical data and income data.

The Adoption Authority of Ireland (www.aai.gov.ie)

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A22 Register of Inter-country Adoptions

Registration is completed by applicant for foreign adoption. Information collected includes biographical details, social work assessment reports, medical data and income data.

The Adoption Authority of Ireland (www.aai.gov.ie)

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A23 EUROCAT Registry

Basic demographic data, data on all congenital anomalies and, where possible, data on exposures to factors that may affect the development of congenital anomalies (e.g. folic acid).

Health Service Executive (www.hse.ie)

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A24 DSP Employment Services Registration Form

Applicant details are collected for registry, including work history, skills, special needs and social inclusion.

Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie)

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A25 HEA Student Record System (SRS) (Course File, Programme File and Survey File)

Data collected on current students and graduates in third-level education (universities and institutes of technology).

Higher Education Authority (www.hea.ie)

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A26 National Cancer Registry

Collection of comprehensive cancer information for the whole population of the Republic of Ireland since 1994.

National Cancer Registry (www.ncri.ie)

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A27 Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) Summary Sheet

The Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) is a health information system designed to collect demographic, clinical and administrative data on discharges and deaths from acute public hospitals nationally. HIPE is the only source of morbidity data available for acute public hospital services in Ireland.

Health Service Executive (www.hse.ie) and the Department of Health

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A28 National Drug Treatment Reporting System

The National Drug Treatment Reporting System (NDTRS) is an epidemiological database on treated problem drug and alcohol use in Ireland. Data are collected on service provision, main and additional problem substances, initial treatment provision, risk behaviours and main socio-demographic characteristics of treated cases.

Health Research Board (www.hrb.ie)

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A29 National Intellectual Disability Database (NIDD)

Database of information about people in Ireland who are receiving intellectual disability services or who are in need of these services.

Department of Health (www.doh.ie).

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A30 National Physical and Sensory Disability Database (NPSDD)

Database of information on usage of and need for specialised disability services for people in Ireland with a physical, sensory and/or speech/language disability. The database monitors current service provision and future service requirements over a 5-year period. It also measures activity and participation restriction.

Department of Health (www.doh.ie).

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A31 National Perinatal Reporting System (NPRS)

The National Perinatal Reporting System (NPRS) collects data on approximately 72,000 birth records each year from 20 Maternity Units and all registered community independent midwives. Information collected includes morbidity, mortality and socio-economic data.

Department of Health (www.doh.ie) and the Health Service Executive (www.hse.ie).

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A32 National Psychiatric In-Patient Reporting System (NPIRS)

The National Psychiatric In-Patient Reporting System (NPIRS) provides detailed information on all admissions and discharges to in-patient psychiatric services in Ireland. Data collected include demographic data. and clinical/diagnostic information. The Hospital Census records all patients resident at midnight on 31st March of the year in question in all psychiatric in-patient facilities around the country (including psychiatric hospitals, general hospital psychiatric units, private hospitals, child and adolescent units, and the Central Mental Hospital, Dundrum) on the Register of Approved Centres under the Mental Health Act 2001. All patients on the books in hospitals and units, including those on leave, are also enumerated in the census; patients who are on the books but absent on the night of census are still enumerated, but are not recorded as resident on the night. Data collected include demographic data and clinical/diagnostic information.

Health Research Board (www.hrb.ie)

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A33 National Psychiatric In-Patient Reporting System (NPIRS): Hospital Census

The Hospital Census records all patients resident at midnight on 31st March of the year in question in all psychiatric in-patient facilities around the country (including psychiatric hospitals, general hospital psychiatric units, private hospitals, child and adolescent units, and the Central Mental Hospital, Dundrum) on the Register of Approved Centres under the Mental Health Act 2001. All patients on the books in hospitals and units, including those on leave, are also enumerated in the census; patients who are on the books but absent on the night of census are still enumerated, but are not recorded as resident on the night. Data collected include demographic data and clinical/diagnostic information.

Health Research Board (www.hrb.ie)

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A34 National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm

Data are recorded relating to the time of presentation to hospital, basic demographic characteristics of the patient who presented, the nature of their self-harming behaviour and the next care recommended after emergency treatment.

National Suicide Research Foundation (www.nsrf.ie)

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A35 National Paediatric Mortality Register (NPMR) (formerly National Sudden Infant Death Register)

The National Paediatric Mortality Register (NPMR; formerly the National Sudden Infant Death Register) obtains accurate, up-to-date information on unexpected/unexplained deaths in infants and young children. Between 1992 and 2011, 726 cases of SIDS were registered on the NPMR. The register also conducts research into the identification of causes and prevention of sudden infant death, as well as formulating childcare guidelines for parents on how best to reduce an infant’s risk of SIDS. From 2010, the NPMR has been providing accurate data on the incidence and categories of all paediatric deaths under 15 years of age on an annual basis.

The National Paediatric Mortality Register (NPMR) is currently owned by the Irish Sudden Infant Death Association (www.sidsireland.ie). The future placement and ownership of the NPMR is currently under consideration by a development group representing the HSE, the Department of Health/Children and Youth Affairs, NPMR and the Temple St Children’s University Hospital.

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A36 National Drug-Related Deaths Index (NDRDI)

The National Drug-Related Deaths Index (NDRDI) is a census ofdrug-related deaths and deaths among drug users in Ireland. Alcoholrelateddeaths and deaths among people who are alcohol-dependentare also recorded. Data sources for the NDRDI include the CoronerService, General Mortality Register, Central Treatment List and HospitalIn-Patient Enquiry (HIPE). Data collected include administrative details,demographics, socio-economic information, problem drug use at timeof the death, risk behaviours, drug treatment history, details about thedeath itself and medical diagnosis.

Health Research Board (www.hrb.ie)

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A37 Patient Treatment Register (PTR)

Register of patients on national waiting lists for in-patient and day-casesurgical and medical treatments.Register of patients on national waiting lists for a first out-patientappointment to a consultant-led public clinic.On-line publication of aggregate numbers per month, per hospital,across various time-bands.

National Treatment Purchase Fund (www.ntpf.ie)

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A38 National Poisons Information Centre Database

Data are collected on all enquiries to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC). These are usually telephone enquiries, but some are eceived by e-mail or post.

National Poisons Information Centre (www.poisons.ie)

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A39 Refugee Application Form

Applicant completes form as a declaration that he or she is anapplicant for refugee status. Data collected include personal detailsof the applicant and relevant family members such as spouse/partner and, if applicable, child/children. The form is signed anddated by the applicant.

Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner (www.orac.ie)

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A40 Unaccompanied Minors Referral Form

A minor under the age of 18 arriving at the Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner and who is not in the custody of an adultwill be referred to the Child and Family Agency (Tusla). The Child andFamily Agency (Tusla) may then decide that an application for asylumshould be made on behalf of the minor. Information collected on theReferral Form includes personal details of the applicant, their countryof origin, the mode of transport used and the route travelled toIreland, their reason for coming to Ireland and the name and locationof their present guardian.

Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner (www.orac.ie)

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A41 Post-Primary Pupil Database

The Post-Primary Pupil Database is currently the only national archiveof student enrolment at post-primary schools. Individual and personaldata on each student enrolled in each recognised post-primaryschool are collected by the Department of Education and Skills.

Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie)

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A42 Post-Primary Student Absence Report

Schools are obliged by law under the Education (Welfare) Act, 2000 to submit reports on school attendance to the Educational WelfareServices of the Child and Family Agency. There are two types ofreporting required and they are (i) reports on individual students and (ii)reports on overall school attendance figures. The data on overall schoolattendance submitted by schools at the end of each school year isanalysed and a national report produced by the Education ResearchCentre (ERC), St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra (www.erc.ie).

Educational Welfare Services, Child and Family Agency (www.tusla.ie)

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A43 Primary Student Absence Report

Schools are obliged by law under the Education (Welfare) Act, 2000to submit reports on school attendance to the Educational WelfareServices of the Child and Family Agency. There are two types ofreporting required and they are (i) reports on individual students and (ii)reports on overall school attendance figures. The data on overall schoolattendance submitted by schools at the end of each school year isanalysed and a national report produced by the Education ResearchCentre (ERC), St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra (www.erc.ie).

Educational Welfare Services, Child and Family Agency (www.tusla.ie)

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A44 Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE): Free Pre-School Year Electronic Return Form

Data are collected in relation to each child participating in theECCE, CETS (Childcare Employment and Training Support) or CCS(Community Childcare Subvention) programmes in each childcarefacility. Data include demographics of the child; number of ECCEhours; information for use by the Department of Education and Skillsto assist with plans for the following year’s primary school education;information on childcare staff; and estimated running costs of thepre-school year. The number of children in the facility who are notparticipating in any of the ECCE, CETS or CCS childcare programmesis also collected, but details of the individual children are not.

Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie)

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A45 Notification to the Mental Health Commission of the Admission of a Child to an Adult Unit in an Approved Centre

The collection of data on admissions (voluntary and involuntary) of children to Approved Centres that have been notified to the Mental Health Commission (MHC).

Mental Health Commission (www.mhcirl.ie)

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A46 Notification to the Mental Health Commission of the Discharge of a Child from an Adult Unit in an Approved Centre

The collection of data on discharges (voluntary and involuntary) of children from Approved Centres that have been notified to the Mental Health Commission (MHC).

Mental Health Commission (www.mhcirl.ie)

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A47 Notification to the Mental Health Commission of the Admission of a Child to a Child Unit in an Approved Centre

Admissions (voluntary and involuntary) of children to Approved Centres (child units) that have been notified to the Mental Health Commission (MHC).

Mental Health Commission (www.mhcirl.ie)

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A48 Notification to the Mental Health Commission of the Discharge of a Child from a Child Unit in an Approved Centre

Discharges (voluntary and involuntary) of children from Approved Centres (child units) that have been notified to the Mental Health Commission (MHC).

Mental Health Commission (www.mhcirl.ie)

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A49 Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (EARS-Net)

National system of surveillance of the antimicrobial resistance profilesof Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli,Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcusaureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Case-based reporting ofthe antimicrobial susceptibility testing data on these 7 importantbacterial pathogens forms the basis to the European AntimicrobialSurveillance Network (EARS-Net) in Ireland. These data are forwardedby laboratories to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC),where the national dataset is collated.

Health Protection Surveillance Centre (www.hpsc.ie).

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A50 Immunisation Uptake of the Primary Childhood Vaccines

National system of surveillance of uptake of the primary childhoodvaccines in children on reaching their 1st and 2nd birthdays. On aquarterly basis, Departments of Public Health report to the HPSC onthe number of children eligible for primary childhood vaccines in theirarea. They also report on each of the Local Health Offices (LHOs) intheir area that have been reported as having completed the primarychildhood immunisation schedule for children by 12 and 24 monthsof age. National data are collated by the HPSC.

Health Protection Surveillance Centre (www.hpsc.ie).

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A51 Infectious Disease Notifications

National system. Case-based reports of notifiable infectious diseasesare forwarded to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)by the Departments of Public Health via CIDR. Departments of PublicHealth are notified of infectious disease cases by GPs or hospitalclinicians using a paper-based system and by laboratories via CIDR.Public Health processes the clinical and lab notification data inCIDR. More detailed surveillance is undertaken by Departments ofPublic Health on selected diseases; this information is collected ondisease-specific forms and these data are input and collated in CIDR.Once records are processed by Public Health, HPSC can review ananonymised version of the data in CIDR.

Health Protection Surveillance Centre (www.hpsc.ie).

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A52 Infectious Disease Outbreaks

National system. Details of outbreaks to Departments of Public Health

Health Protection Surveillance Centre (www.hpsc.ie).

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Longitudinal Data Sources

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L1 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on family context, child’s health, relationships, respondent’s health, household income and neighbourhood.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L2 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on a range of sensitive issues, such as marital relationship, marital conflict, fertility and pregnancy, experience of depression, feelings, drug use and any non-resident parents.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L3 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on the characteristics of the secondary caregiver (health and lifestyle), their relationship with the child and socio-demographics.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L4 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on a range of sensitive issues, such as marital relationship, marital conflict, fertility and pregnancy, experience of depression, feelings, drug use and any non-resident parents.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L5 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on the person’s relationship with the Study child, financial support for the Study child and socio-demographics.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L6 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Home-based Carer Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Home-based Carer Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on the carer’s childcare qualifications and experience, relationship with the Study child and socio-demographics. Home-based carers were defined as those who regularly provided care (more than 9 hours per week) for the Study child, either in their own home or in the home of the Study child. Parental care is not included in this category.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L7 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort – Wave 1 Centre-based Carer Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Centre-based Carer Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort recorded information on the carer’s childcare qualifications and experience, relationship with the Study child and socio-demographics. Centre-based carers were defined as those who regularly provided care (more than 9 hours per week) for the Study child in a childcare centre. Parental care is not included in this category.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L8 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded data on household composition, child’s health, health services, diet and exercise, the primary caregiver’s health and lifestyle, activities, emotional health, education, socio-demographics, neighbourhood and community.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L9 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnair

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on a range of sensitive issues, including marital relationships, martial conflict, experience of depression, feelings, drug use and any non-resident parents.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

[Read] [Print PDF]

L10 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnair

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on the relationship between the secondary caregiver and the Study child, details of their lifestyle and health, and socio-demographics.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L11 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on a range of sensitive issues, including marital relationships, martial conflict, experience of depression, feelings, drug use and any non-resident parents.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L12 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Child Main Questionnaire for the Child Cohort included questions on school, food, activities, likes and dislikes. Open-ended questions allowed for a wide range of descriptive data to be collected; for example, children were asked to describe what they would like to be when they grow up, to describe what makes them most happy, what they are most afraid of and why they like living in Ireland.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L13 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child Supplementary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Child Supplementary Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded sensitive information on the respondent’s neighbourhood, school (including their feelings towards school, teachers and experience of bullying) and their family. Parents/guardians were shown a blank copy of the questionnaire only.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L14 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child on Mother Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Child on Mother Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information about the mother’s encouragement of the child’s performance at school, the mother–child relationship and parenting style.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L15 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child on Father Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Child on Father Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information about the father’s encouragement of the child’s performance at school, the father–child relationship and parenting style.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L16 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child on Mother’s Partner Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
Where relevant, the Child on Mother’s Partner Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information about the mother’s partner’s encouragement of the child’s performance at school, the mother’s partner–child relationship and parenting style.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L17 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child on Father’s Partner Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Child on Father’s Partner Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information about the father’s partner’s encouragement of the child’s performance at school, the father’s partner–child relationship and parenting style.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L18 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Teacher on Pupil Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Teacher on Pupil Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded specific information about the Study child, such as temperament, academic performance and school preparedness.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L19 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Teacher on Self Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Teacher on Self Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded general information about the class(room) characteristics, such as size, curriculum and preferred teaching methods, as well as some personal details about the teacher.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L20 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Principal Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Principal Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on school characteristics, including size, challenges and ethos, as well as some personal details about the Principal.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L21 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Time Use Diary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Time Use Diary Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded details of how Study children spend their time. Parents were asked to fill in the questionnaire with the Study child.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L22 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on the person’s relationship with the Study child, financial support for the Study child and socio-demographics.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L23 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Home-based Carer Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Home-based Carer Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on the carer’s childcare qualifications and experience, relationship with the Study child and socio-demographics. Home-based carers were defined as those who regularly provided care (more than 9 hours per week) for the Study child, either in their own home or in the home of the Study child. Parental care is not included in this category.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L24 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Centre-based Carer Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence.
 

 
The Centre-based Carer Questionnaire for the Child Cohort recorded information on the carer’s childcare qualifications and experience, relationship with the Study child and socio-demographics. Centre-based carers were defined as those who regularly provided care (more than 9 hours per week) for the Study child in a childcare centre. Parental care is not included in this category.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L25 Lifeways Study: Health, Lifestyle and Nutrition Baseline Questionnaire, 2001-2002

Lifeways is a longitudinal cross-generation cohort study, designed to collect longitudinal life-course data in Ireland and investigate the effect of food and nutrition on health. The principal aim is to follow the growth and development of children from the ante-natal stage throughout childhood and to understand what factors affect this growth, including environmental factors, lifestyle and healthcare experience. The study investigates the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social relationships, family, lifestyle, nutrition and health outcomes. A number of the study participants have 3 generations of the same family involved, enabling patterns and links to be established. Family doctors, with the consent of participants, also provide data.
 

 
The Baseline Questionnaire recorded data on diet, exercise, alcohol consumption and socio-economic status. Lifeways’ mothers were also questioned on their intake of vitamins, minerals or other food supplements during pregnancy.

University College, Dublin (www.ucd.ie/phpps)

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L26 Lifeways Study: Health, Lifestyle and Nutrition Grandparent Exam, 2002

Lifeways is a longitudinal cross-generation cohort study, designed to collect longitudinal life-course data in Ireland and investigate the effect of food and nutrition on health. The principal aim is to follow the growth and development of children from the ante-natal stage throughout childhood and to understand what factors affect this growth, including environmental factors, lifestyle and healthcare experience. The study investigates the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social relationships, family, lifestyle, nutrition and health outcomes. A number of the study participants have 3 generations of the same family involved, enabling patterns and links to be established. Family doctors, with the consent of participants, also provide data.
 

 
The Grandparent Exam, 2002 consisted of a clinical examination of grandparents. Blood samples were collected for analysis of a lipid profile and data recorded included blood pressure measurements, weight, height and waist and hip circumference. Prior to the clinical exam, respondents were issued with a questionnaire that recorded data on their current health status.

University College, Dublin (www.ucd.ie/phpps)

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L27 Lifeways Study: Health, Lifestyle and Nutrition GP Follow-up Questionnaire, 2005

Lifeways is a longitudinal cross-generation cohort study, designed to collect longitudinal life-course data in Ireland and investigate the effect of food and nutrition on health. The principal aim is to follow the growth and development of children from the ante-natal stage throughout childhood and to understand what factors affect this growth, including environmental factors, lifestyle and healthcare experience. The study investigates the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social relationships, family, lifestyle, nutrition and health outcomes. A number of the study participants have 3 generations of the same family involved, enabling patterns and links to be established. Family doctors, with the consent of participants, also provide data.
 

 
The GP Follow-up Questionnaire, 2005 was sent to the GPs of all adult and child cohort members and recorded data on their health status (including diagnoses of stroke, cancer and myocardial infarction for the adult cohort), GMS eligibility and frequency of health service utilisation. For grandparents, data on blood pressure and blood lipid profile were included. For the child cohort, data on asthma diagnosis and treatment were included.

University College, Dublin (www.ucd.ie/phpps)

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L28 Lifeways Study: Health, Lifestyle and Nutrition Follow-up Questionnaire, 2007

Lifeways is a longitudinal cross-generation cohort study, designed to collect longitudinal life-course data in Ireland and investigate the effect of food and nutrition on health. The principal aim is to follow the growth and development of children from the ante-natal stage throughout childhood and to understand what factors affect this growth, including environmental factors, lifestyle and healthcare experience. The study investigates the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social relationships, family, lifestyle, nutrition and health outcomes. A number of the study participants have 3 generations of the same family involved, enabling patterns and links to be established. Family doctors, with the consent of participants, also provide data.
 

 
The Follow-up Questionnaire, 2007 was issued to Lifeways’ mothers and recorded data on their health, nutrition, diet and socio-economic factors, as well as data on the family’s health and the health, development and behaviour of their children.

University College, Dublin (www.ucd.ie/phpps)

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L29 Lifeways Study: Health, Lifestyle and Nutrition Parent-held Child Study Record

Lifeways is a longitudinal cross-generation cohort study, designed to collect longitudinal life-course data in Ireland and investigate the effect of food and nutrition on health. The principal aim is to follow the growth and development of children from the ante-natal stage throughout childhood and to understand what factors affect this growth, including environmental factors, lifestyle and healthcare experience. The study investigates the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social relationships, family, lifestyle, nutrition and health outcomes. A number of the study participants have 3 generations of the same family involved, enabling patterns and links to be established. Family doctors, with the consent of participants, also provide data.
 

 
The Parent-held Child Study Record was issued to a subset of Lifeways’ parents and recorded data on the Study child’s contacts with healthcare professionals, including details of any illnesses, immunisations and developmental milestones from their
 
1st year to 5 years of age.

University College, Dublin (www.ucd.ie/phpps)

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L30 Lifeways Study: Health, Lifestyle and Nutrition Follow-up Parent Questionnaire, 2011-2013

Lifeways is a longitudinal cross-generation cohort study, designed to collect longitudinal life-course data in Ireland and investigate the effect of food and nutrition on health. The principal aim is to follow the growth and development of children from the ante-natal stage throughout childhood and to understand what factors affect this growth, including environmental factors, lifestyle and healthcare experience. The study investigates the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social relationships, family, lifestyle, nutrition and health outcomes. A number of the study participants have 3 generations of the same family involved, enabling patterns and links to be established. Family doctors, with the consent of participants, also provide data.
 

 
The Follow-up Parent Questionnaire, 2011-2013 recorded data on a range of topics, including health status, occupation, household, mental well-being, current economic circumstances and the presence of asthma in the Study child.

University College, Dublin (www.ucd.ie/phpps)

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L31 European Survey on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC)

The primary focus of SILC is the collection of information on the income and living conditions of different types of households in Ireland in order to derive indicators on poverty, deprivation and social exclusion. It is a voluntary survey (for potential respondents) of private households and is carried out under EU legislation (Council Regulation No. 1177/2003). It commenced in Ireland in June 2003. The income reference period for SILC is the 12 months prior to date of interview.

Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L32 Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS)

Survey to produce quarterly labour force estimates and occasional reports on special social topics, providing estimates on short-term indicators of the labour market (employment, unemployment, etc), as well as information on other social topics such as atypical work and crime. Data on the individual relate to employment, education and income. Some housing details also collected, including dwelling type and facilities. The QNHS also conducts special modules on different social topics each quarter.

Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L33 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort (at 3 years ) recorded information on family context, child’s health and development , relationships, respondent’s health, household income and neighbourhood.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L34 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort (at 3 years ) recorded information on a range of sensitive issues, such as marital relationship, marital conflict, fertility and pregnancy, experience of depression, feelings, drug use and any non-resident parents.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L35 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort (at 3 years ) recorded information on the characteristics of the secondary caregiver (health and lifestyle), their relationship with the child and socio-demographics.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L36 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort (at 3 years ) recorded information on a range of sensitive issues, such as marital relationship, marital conflict, experience of depression, feelings, drug use and any non-resident parents.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L37 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort at 3 years  recorded information on the person’s relationship with the Study child, financial support for the Study child and socio-demographics.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L38 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Home-based Carer Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Home-based Carer Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort at 3 years  recorded information on the carer’s childcare qualifications and experience, relationship with the Study child, how the study child spends his/her time while in care and socio-demographics. Home-based carers were defined as those who regularly provided care (8 hours or more per week) for the Study child, either in their own home or in the home of the Study child. Parental care is not included in this category.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L39 Growing Up in Ireland: Infant Cohort at 3 years – Wave 2 Centre-based Carer Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Centre-based Carer Questionnaire for the Infant Cohort (at 3 years ) recorded information on the carer’s childcare qualifications and experience, relationship with the Study child, how the child spends his/her time while in the centre’s care and socio-demographics. Centre-based carers were defined as those who regularly provided care (8 or more hours per week) for the Study child in a childcare centre. Parental care is not included in this category.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L40 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 1 Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) is a national longitudinal study of children being conducted with the aim of improving understanding of all aspects of children’s lives and their development in the current social, economic and cultural environment. The principal objective of the GUI study is to describe the lives of children in order to establish what is typical and normal, as well as what is atypical and problematic. This information will be used to assist in policy formation and in the provision of services that will ensure all children will have the best possible start in life. The study focuses on a broad range of outcomes. Being longitudinal, it examines developmental trajectories over time, tracking the development of two cohorts: approx. 11,000 infants (9 months old) tracking them into early childhood and approx. 8,500 children (9 years old) tracking them into early adolescence. The Primary Caregiver Main Questionnaire for the Child Cohort (at 13 years ) recorded data on household composition, child’s health, diet and exercise, the primary caregiver’s health, the child’s emotional health, the family context, education, socio-demographics, neighbourhood and community.

Consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (www.esri.ie) and Trinity College, Dublin (www.tcd.ie)

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L41 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Primary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L42 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Secondary Caregiver Main Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L43 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Secondary Caregiver Supplementary Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L44 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Young Person Main Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L45 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child Supplementary Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L46 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Young Person on Mother Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L47 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Young Person on Father Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L48 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort – Wave 1 Child on Mother’s Partner Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L49 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 School Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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L50 Growing Up in Ireland: Child Cohort at 13 years – Wave 2 Non-Resident Parent Questionnaire

Funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (www.dcya.ie), in association with the Department of Social Protection (www.welfare.ie) and the Central Statistics Office (www.cso.ie)

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Survey Data Sources

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S1 All-Ireland Survey of Breathing Problems and Related Disorders

On-going series of national surveys carried out in a sample of Irish schools, following an international protocol, on the prevalence of asthma and wheeze among young people in the Republic of Ireland. Data include prevalence of medical conditions associated with allergic reaction; prevalence of breathing conditions; history of asthma; interference of breathing problems with daily activities and participation. The most recent study (2007) includes additional questions on smoking habits of children and also of their parents and family members.

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S2 Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Case Questionnaire

Voluntary survey completed by family members (usually parents) of sudden, unexpected/unexplained deaths in infants and young children. Data collected include details of pregnancy and birth, infant health and well-being, parenting practices, socio-demographics and the circumstances surrounding the death of the infant. Post-mortem results and medical records are also requested and obtained with the family’s signed consent.

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S3 Census of the Population of Ireland

The Census of Population provides comprehensive national population data. At national level, current population statistics are essential for planning the provision of healthcare, education, employment, etc. Regional and county figures are critical for determining regional policy and for the operation of regional and local authorities. The greatest strength of the Census is the provision of detailed population figures at local level.

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S4 Cystic Fibrosis Annual Assessment

Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients who are registered with the Cystic Fibrosis Registry of Ireland (CFRI) are assessed every year by their specialist medical team using the Annual Assessment and information is updated on the register. Updated data include all infections and treatments that have occurred over the previous 12 months. Enrolment on the register is done through the specialist CF centres (see Cystic Fibrosis Registration and Diagnosis Form).

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S5 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and

Survey on the use of tobacco, alcohol and illegal drugs in the schoolgoing population of 15-16 year-olds. The most important goal of the

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S6 Equal Access Survey

Each year, as part of the student registration process, 28 publicly ESPAD Survey is to monitor trends in alcohol and other drug use, and

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S7 Follow-up Survey of FÁS/SOLAS Participants

Survey of non-sponsored participants in FÁS/SOLAS training and to compare trends between countries and groups of countries. The rationale for school surveys is that students make up the age groups when onset of use is most likely to occur.

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S8 Household Budget Survey (HBS): Household Questionnaire

Survey of private households measuring a range of budgetary issues, including weekly household expenditure, disposable income, detailed item of expenditure, taxation, State benefits, imputed expenditure, holidays, possession of household appliances and usage of household facilities. Information on average size and composition of households

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S9 DEIS Achievements and Attitudes in Primary Schools: Pupil Questionnaire

Independent evaluation of the implementation of and impact of the New School Support Programme (SSP) component of DEIS in primary schools. Pupils complete a questionnaire about their attitudes to school and about their leisure pursuits. In schools in the urban dimension of the SSP, pupils in 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th classes were involved. In schools in the rural dimension of the SSP, pupils in 3rd and 6th classes only were involved.

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S10 DEIS Achievements and Attitudes in Primary Schools (2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th classes): Achievements testing

Independent evaluation of the implementation of and impact of the New School Support Programme (SSP) component of DEIS in primary schools. Pupils take a short test in Maths and English reading. In schools in the urban dimension of the SSP, pupils in 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th classes were involved. In schools in the rural dimension of the SSP, pupils in 3rd and 6th classes were involved. Testing was repeated in the same schools and with many of the same pupils in the spring of 2010 and again between 2010 and 2013.

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S11 DEIS: What students think (1st year): Student Questionnaire

Independent evaluation of the implementation of and impact of the New School Support Programme (SSP) component of DEIS in post-primary schools. All participating post-primary schools were asked to facilitate a questionnaire survey of all students in 1st year. The questionnaire covered a number of issues, including students’ experience of transition from primary to post-primary school, their attitudes to school, their leisure activities and their educational aspirations.

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S12 DEIS: What students think (3rd year): Student Questionnaire

Independent evaluation of the implementation of and impact of the New School Support Programme (SSP) component of DEIS in schools. All participating post-primary schools were asked to complete a questionnaire survey of all students in 3rd year. The questionnaire covered a number of issues, including students’ attitudes to school, their leisure activities and educational aspirations and plans.

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S13 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC): Student Questionnaire General

Cross-national study conducted in collaboration with the WHO Regional Office for Europe, to gain insight into young people’s health and well-being, health include general health, smoking, use of alcohol and other substances, behaviours and their social context. Areas food and dietary behaviour, exercise and physical activity, self-care, injuries and bullying.

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S14 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC): Student Questionnaire (Middle Childhood)

Cross-national study conducted in collaboration with the WHO Regional Office for Europe, to gain insight into young people’s health and well-being, health behaviours and their social context. Abbreviated version of the main HBSC questionnaire administered.

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S15 National Assessments 2009: 2nd Class: Parent/Guardian Questionnaire

The Parent/Guardian Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. The questionnaire was completed by parents/guardians of pupils in 2nd class and contained questions concerning both the parent and their child. Contextual data on parental/guardian background characteristics, literacy-related activities and educational materials in the home were also collected.

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S16 National Assessments 2009: 2nd Class: Pupil Questionnaire

The Pupil Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. It was completed by primary school pupils in 2nd class. Questions were asked on attitudes to and interest in reading, attitudes to and engagement in reading and mathematics, language spoken in the home, homework practices, frequency and engagement in leisure activities, and educational aspirations and expectations.

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S17 National Assessments 2009: 2nd Class: Pupil Rating Form

The Pupil Rating Form was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. Each class teacher was asked to provide on the Pupil Rating Form contextual information about each pupil who participated in the Pupil Questionnaire (see S16). Areas covered included attendance, receipt of additional support, general academic ability and class level of English/Mathematics materials typically used by a pupil.

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S18 National Assessments 2009: 2nd Class: Teacher Questionnaire

The Teacher Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. The questionnaire was completed by primary school teachers of 2nd class, with questions concerning themselves and their class, such as the teacher’s background characteristics, teaching practices for reading and mathematics lessons, and access to and organisation of resources.

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S19 National Assessments 2009: 6th Class: Parent/Guardian Questionnaire

The Parent/Guardian Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. The questionnaire was completed by parents/guardians of 6th class pupils and contained questions concerning both the parent and their child. Contextual data also collected on parental/guardian background characteristics, literacyrelated activities and educational materials in the home.

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S20 National Assessments 2009: 6th Class: Pupil Questionnaire

The Pupil Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. It was completed by 6th class primary school pupils. Questions were asked on attitudes to and interest in reading, attitudes to and engagement in reading and mathematics, language spoken in the home, homework practices, frequency and engagement in leisure activities, and educational aspirations and expectations.

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S21 National Assessments 2009: 6th Class: Pupil Rating Form

The Pupil Rating Form was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. Teachers completed a Pupil Rating Form for each pupil selected to take part in the Pupil Questionnaire (see S20). The form sought information on some pupil background variables and asked the teacher to rate the pupils on a number of variables, including achievement in English.

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S22 National Assessments 2009: 6th Class: Teacher Questionnaire

The Teacher Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematics achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. The questionnaire was completed by primary school teachers of 6th class, with questions concerning themselves and their class, such as the teacher’s background characteristics, teaching practices for reading and mathematics lessons, and access to and organisation of resources.

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S23 National Assessments 2009: School Questionnaire

The School Questionnaire was part of a broader study to examine the reading and mathematical achievement of primary school pupils in 2nd and 6th classes. It was administered to school Principals to obtain information about school characteristics, including enrolment characteristics, staffing and resources, and school planning.

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S24 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA): School Questionnaire

Internationally standardised assessment jointly developed by a number of participating economies and administered to students near the end of compulsory education (15-year-olds). Data collected include characteristics of the school and student body; school resources, organisation and staffing; the environment in the school; and preparation for career and further education. The 2012 cycle included an optional computer-based assessment of mathematics, reading and problem solving, which Ireland along with 31 other countries participated in. An optional assessment of financial literacy was also administered in 18 countries although not in Ireland.

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S25 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA): Pupil Questionnaire

Internationally standardised assessment jointly developed by a number of participating economies and administered to students near the end of compulsory education (15-year-olds). Data collected on family and home; time spent studying, working and on out-of-school activities; views on issues relating to mathematics achievement, motivation to engage in mathematics related tasks, mathematics self-efficacy and self-concept and anxiety related to mathematics. The 2012 cycle included an optional computer-based assessment of mathematics, reading and problem solving, which Ireland along with 31 other countries participated in. An optional assessment of financial literacy was also administered in 18 countries although not in Ireland.

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S26 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA): Teacher Questionnaire

Teachers of Maths were surveyed in conjunction with the administration of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2012. Although the international element of PISA does not include a teacher questionnaire, this questionnaire was developed and administered in Ireland to teachers of Maths in PISA 2012. Questions were asked about various aspects of the teaching and assessment of Maths in general, as well as their views and opinions of the Project Maths Programme and on Transition year maths.

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S27 Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initivative (COSI) in ROI: School Return Form

The Irish part of the COSI survey is affiliated with the World Health Organization (WHO) European COSI, which was set up in 2008 with the WHO Regional Office for Europe and initially thirteen Member States. It is the first standardised, European-wide surveillance system for nutrition policy development. The NNSC carries out this surveillance in Ireland and collects data on children’s weight, height and waist circumference. This surveillance is systematic and involves the collection, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of descriptive data for monitoring obesity levels and for use in programme planning and evaluation. The School Return Form is completed preferably by the school Principal or otherwise a secretary or a teacher. The form includes questions on absenteeism rates on the day of measurement and on the school environment.

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S28 Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI) in ROI: Examiner's Record Form

The Irish part of the COSI survey is affiliated with the World Health Organization (WHO) European COSI, which was set up in 2008 with the WHO Regional Office for Europe and initially thirteen Member States. It is the first standardised, European-wide surveillance system for nutrition policy development. The NNSC carries out this surveillance in Ireland and collects data on children’s weight, height and waist circumference. This surveillance is systematic and involves the collection, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of descriptive data for monitoring obesity levels and for use in programme planning and evaluation. Surveillance has been carried out in 2008 (children in 1st class, aged 6-7), in 2010 (children in 1st class, aged 6-7 and in 3rd class, aged 8-9) and in 2012/2013 (children in 1st class, aged 6-7, in 3rd class, aged 8-9 and in 5th class, aged 10-11). The Examiner’s Record Form is completed by the person carrying out the measurements on the child (height, weight and waist circumference).

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S29 Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initivative (COSI) in ROI: Family Survey

The Irish part of the COSI survey is affiliated with the World Health Organization (WHO) European COSI, which was set up in 2008 with the WHO Regional Office for Europe and initially thirteen Member States. It is the first standardised, European-wide surveillance system for nutrition policy development. The NNSC carries out this surveillance in Ireland and collects data on children’s weight, height and waist circumference. This surveillance is systematic and involves the collection, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of descriptive data for monitoring obesity levels and for use in programme planning and evaluation. In the 2010 and the 2012/2013 waves of data collection, a Family Survey was sent out to consenting parents for completion and posting back to the NNSC. Included were questions on the child’s diet, physical activity and lifestyle, as well as questions about them as parents.

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S30 Children’s Sport Participation and Physical Activity (CSPPA) Study: Primary School Pupil Questionnaire

The CSPPA Study aims to provide a national database of physical activity, physical education and sport participation levels among children and young people in Ireland in the age range 10-18 years. Factors that influence the participation of children and young people in sport and physical activity, and issues surrounding volunteering in youth sports and activity clubs, are also assessed. Data collected will assist in policy development in the areas of health, sport, education, transport and the environment, all of which play a role in increasing activity levels among children. Data were collected from children and young people in primary and post-primary schools using a selfcomplete questionnaire, interview and physical health data (height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure). The primary school questionnaire was issued to pupils in 5th and 6th classes and included questions on physical activity levels, transport and participation in sports clubs and sports in school.

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S31 Children’s Sport Participation and Physical Activity (CSPPA) Study: Primary School Administrator Questionnaire

The CSPPA Study aims to provide a national database of physical activity, physical education and sport participation levels among children and young people in Ireland in the age range 10-18 years. Factors that influence the participation of children and young people in sport and physical activity, and issues surrounding volunteering in youth sports and activity clubs, are also assessed. Data collected will assist in policy development in the areas of health, sport, education, transport and the environment, all of which play a role in increasing activity levels among children. Data were collected from children and young people in primary and post-primary schools using a self-complete questionnaire, interview and physical health data (height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure). Primary school Principals (or their nominees) were issued a questionnaire containing questions on their perceptions of sport and physical education, issues in providing physical education and the relationship between the school ethos and school sport and physical activity.

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S32 Children’s Sport Participation and Physical Activity (CSPPA) Study: Post-Primary School Pupil Questionnaire

The CSPPA Study aims to provide a national database of physical activity, physical education and sport participation levels among children and young people in Ireland in the age range 10-18 years. Factors that influence the participation of children and young people in sport and physical activity, and issues surrounding volunteering in youth sports and activity clubs, are also assessed. Data collected will assist in policy development in the areas of health, sport, education, transport and the environment, all of which play a role in increasing activity levels among children. Data were collected from children and young people in primary and post-primary schools using a self-complete questionnaire, interview and physical health data (height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure). The post-primary school questionnaire was issued to pupils in 1st to 6th years, with the average age of participants being 14.5 years. Questions were based on physical activity levels, participation in sport and physical activities in school and outside school, physical education classes in school and their local environment.

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S33 Children’s Sport Participation and Physical Activity (CSPPA) Study: Administrator Questionnaire

The CSPPA Study aims to provide a national database of physical activity, physical education and sport participation levels among children and young people in Ireland in the age range 10-18 years. Factors that influence the participation of children and young people in sport and physical activity, and issues surrounding volunteering in youth sports and activity clubs, are also assessed. Data collected will assist in policy development in the areas of health, sport, education, transport and the environment, all of which play a role in increasing activity levels among children. Data were collected from children and young people in primary and post-primary schools using a self-complete questionnaire, interview and physical health data (height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure). Post-primary school Principals (or their nominees) were issued a questionnaire containing questions on their perceptions of sport and physical education, issues in providing physical education and the relationship between the school ethos and school sport and physical activity.

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