Skip Navigation, or press ALT and K together and then press enter.Welcome to the OMC website. This site has been developed for both the visually impaired and non visually impaired. If you would like to use the visually impaired version of this site please go to omc.gov.ie/viewtxt.asp, or press ALT and I together and then press enter



article

Coming Into Care

 

Why Do Children Come into Care?

Children come into care for a wide range of reasons. These reasons can include the death of their parent(s), a parent may have a serious long term illness or a parent may have a significant and ongoing mental illness or addiction problem which leaves them unable to care for their child. Some parental problems result in physical or sexual harm to a child, however the most common reason for a child to come into care is due to neglect. The decision about a child being received into care is based on the child’s needs, following an assessment, regardless of the reason for the parent being unable to provide proper care and protection to the child.


The HSE reported that in 2012, there was a rise in all categories of abuse as the primary reason for admission to care, with the highest proportionate rises being emotional abuse and neglect. Emotional abuse, as a primary reason for admission to care rose in 2012. Neglect, as a primary reason for admission to care, rose 19% in 2012. It is also noted that a child welfare concern, as the primary reason for admission, fell by 30% in 2012.

 

Primary Reason for admission to care

2011

Change

No.

2011

 

%

2012

 

No.

2012

 

%

Change

 

%

 

Physical abuse

169

7.6%

173

8.4%

4

2%

Emotional abuse

87

3.9%

154

7.4%

67

44%

Sexual abuse

33

1.5%

35

1.7%

2

6%

Neglect

483

21.8%

593

28.6%

110

19%

Child welfare concern

1446

65.2%

1,115

53.9%

-331

-30%

Total     

2,218

100.0%

2,070

100.0%

-148

-7%

 

On the 31st December 2012, the HSE reported that there were 6,332 children in care, an increase on the same day in 2011, when it was reported that 6,160 children were in care. The HSE also reported that during 2012, 2,070 children were admitted to care with 1,898 children being discharged. Overall admissions to care fell by 7% between 2011 (n= 2248) and 2012 (n= 2070).  Around  42%  (n=2,666)  of  children  in  care  in  December  2012  were  there  under  a  voluntary  care arrangement.  The HSE also report that 44.4% of the children admitted to care during 2012 were also discharged within the year.

 

Number and rate (per 1,000) of children admitted to care (2006-2012)

Year

Number of Children Admitted to Care

Number of Children Nationally

Rate per 1,000 Children

2012

2,070

1,160,200

 

2011

2,248

1,148,687

2.0

2010

2,291

1,127,672

2.0

2009

2,372

1,107,034

2.1

2008

2,013

1,085,258

1.9

2007

2,134

1,056,947

2.0

2006

1,845

1,036,034

1.8

 

Number and rate (per 1,000) of children admitted to care (2006-2012)

Year

Number of Children Admitted to Care

Number of Children Nationally

Rate per 1,000 Children

2012

6,332

1,160,200

 

2011

6,160

1,148,687

5.4

2010

5,965

1,127,672

5.3

2009

5,674

1,107,034

5.1

2008

5,357

1,085,258

4.9

2007

5,307

1,056,947

5.0

2006

5,247

1,036,034

5.1

 

Further data relating to children in care is contained here.

Snap shot of monthly and quarterly data is available here.

 

Supervision Orders

The Child Care Act, 1991 provides for the Child and Family Agency to apply to the Court for a Supervision Order. A Supervision Order gives the Child and Family Agency the authority to visit and monitor the health and welfare of the child and to give the parents any necessary advice. The order is for up to a maximum of 12 months but may be renewed.

The Court Service Annual Report 2013 noted that there were 970 supervision orders granted by the Courts compared to 1,074 in 2012.

follow us on twitter skills to work Supporting SMEs http://whodoeswhat.gov.ie/ Be Winter Ready The Better Start Access and Inclusion Model (AIM) is a model of supports designed to ensure that children with disabilities can access the Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) programme